Now Available! The Motivated Job Search Workbook

The Motivated Job Search Workbook contains thought provoking questions and exercises that correlate directly with Brian Howard’s job search books, The Motivated Job Search and Over 50 and Motivated!

Conducting a job search can be a daunting task, especially if that job search was put upon you unexpectedly. Thoughts and questions like where to start, what to do, priorities, how to deal with feelings, where to go for information among so many others can quickly overwhelm you. This workbook, used with The Motivated Job Search or Over 50 and Motivated will get you through it! It will lead you to your next job!

With plenty of writing space, The Motivated Job Search Workbook, takes you through the step-by-step process of a job search. The questions and exercises are simple but will make you think about yourself, your professional value to employers, your successes, your brand, and all of the practical action items you must do to successfully execute a job search. Written as a comprehensive workbook for the entire job search process, it will keep you organized, keep you thinking, and keep you motivated!

The workbook can be purchased through the publisher, WriteLife Publishing or on Amazon.

Now in stock on Amazon! Over 50 and Motivated! and, The Motivated Job Search Workbook

Over 50 and Motivated! – the newest book release by Brian Howard is now available on Amazon. Over 50 and Motivated! is a job search book written for the special circumstances facing job seekers over the age of 50.

 

Also available is The Motivated Job Search Workbook which contains thought provoking questions and exercises that correlate to your job search. The workbook is designed to keep you thinking, keep you organized and keep you motivated!

Brian Howard Talks About the Advantages of a Self Motivated Job Search

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In this short recording, Brian Howard discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a proactive versus a passive job search strategy. Listen while Brian lays out the statistics and the many advantages of a proactive…self motivated job search strategy.

About: Brian Howard, J.D. is a Certified Career Management Coach (CCMC), a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS), a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW), and an actively practicing executive recruiter. He has helped thousands of job seekers over his 24 year recruiting career. It is from this experience and knowledge that he wrote The Motivated Series of Job Search Books. These books include The Motivated Job Search, The Motivated Networker, and Over 50 and Motivated (Release date March, 2017). The books can be purchased on Amazon.

SHRM Report: Recruiting Difficulty on the Rise

According to the Society for Human Resource Management’s recent report (Leading Indicators of National Employment, October 2016 Overview), “Recruiting Difficulty” in the services sectors rose 9.8% compared to the same period a year ago.

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The “Recruiting Difficulty” index measures how difficult it is for firms to recruit candidates of greatest strategic importance to their companies. The 9.8% increase represents a four year high in the services sector!

In addition, more than two-thirds of HR professionals (68 percent) reported challenging recruiting conditions in the current talent market.

What does this mean for job seekers?

According to Brian Howard, President of The Howard Group and author of The Motivated Job Search, “an obvious conclusion is if you are a well-qualified job seeker in your field, there are likely open positions available to you. The key is to network and proactively make it known that you are open to discussions about a job move.”

Brian Howard, J.D. is a Certified Career Management Coach (CCMC), a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS), a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW), and an actively practicing executive recruiter. He has helped thousands of job seekers over his 24 year recruiting career. It is from this experience and knowledge that he wrote The Motivated Job Search and The Motivated Networker. (Both available through Amazon)

A Story of Inspiration

I received a wonderful story of inspiration last week that I want to share with you.

A Story of Inspiration

For nearly 40 years I have worked in the employee benefits industry in various capacities. It has been a wonderful and fulfilling career. For the past five years I was in sales with a company which ironically was the most stressful position that I have ever had. So much has changed in business today and I’m not referring to advancements in technology. There is simply a lack of business-honor unlike the past.

In March I turned 60 and having another good year in sales. Then, in July I was unexpectedly fired. It came from out of the blue!  My employer’s justification was weak since my sales numbers were good. It was tough going home that night telling my wife that I had been fired. There were some tears.

Now, who is going to hire a 60-year-old man? That was the question swirling around in my mind. I was referred to a book, The Motivated Job Search.  Two take a-ways from the book that changed everything for me.

  • One, don’t waste time brooding! Clear your head, put all bitterness aside, and get on with your life and a new search for employment. “Don’t be bitter, be better” was my mantra!
  • Two, think about reinventing yourself, think outside the box, find a new angle

With these concepts in mind, I started making calls to my close colleagues and contacts in the industry. I sought their advice on ideas of what I may be suited for in their view. Ideas started to flow as I considered everything that they said. I opened myself up to anything and everything.

After one week, I made a decision to explore a certain service sector of the employee benefits industry. I identified several companies in this new sector based on company names I gathered during my networking calls and simple Internet research.

I decided to contact these companies directly by phone. I created a simple presentation of about myself so I had something to say and started calling the companies. I spoke with anyone who would listen and got transferred around several times. Eventually, I spoke with those that could make or influence the hiring decision. In this new industry sector, it was common to hire independent contractors, which was what I wanted.

The plan worked! Two weeks and a day after being fired, I was offered a job! And, my first work assignment was just a few weeks away. Mission accomplished!

While not at the same pay or potential income annually I was free of corporate shenanigans and all that goes with it. I am so excited that I have a new career direction still in the employee benefit space with companies that actually love my experience! That to me is worth its weight in gold!…to be appreciated and valued.

I know it’s a challenge for those of us over 50 to conduct a job search especially when we find ourselves suddenly unemployed. The emotions of doubt, fear, and uncertainty can easily get to you quickly. It’s hard. I know because I lived it! But you can’t let this new reality beat you down and in particular stress you to the point of causing illness or death.

My advice…Take heart! Get up and dust yourself off! Seek guidance in the counsel of others and in reading. Plot a course of action and get on with it! Just like me, you CAN write a new chapter in your career. You CAN continue your career until you want it to end…and, not the other way around.

A.R.

Age 60

Now Available! The Motivated Job Search book

I am pleased to announce the release of The Motivated Job Search book!

I wrote The Motivated Job Search for career-minded professionals who want simple and direct answers on how to conduct a job search.

Most job seekers do not know how to effectively conduct a job search in today’s job market, which is completely understandable. The skills to find a job are not exactly top-of-mind. The Motivated Job Search takes you through a step-by-step job search process and teaches you how to stand out and get the job you want!

The Motivated Job Search covers meaningful topics like how to correctly prepare for a job search, profiling your next job, understanding the employer’s mind, branding, elevator speech, success stories, LinkedIn, networking, social media, and how to penetrate the hidden job market, along with a myriad of useful job search tools not otherwise written about in other job search books. The book promotes a self-motivated job search approach where job seekers proactively engage the job market and employers in meaningful ways that result in job offers!

Check out the book on Amazon, or purchase it directly (most cost effective way) from the publisher, WriteLife Publishing (an imprint of BQB Publishing Company).

 

About the Author: Brian Howard is a Certified Career Management Coach (CCMC), a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS), a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW), and an actively practicing executive recruiter. He has helped thousands of job seekers over the course of his career. With over 23 years of real world recruiting experience, he has received various accolades and international acclaim for his recruiting ability, and is a member of an international recruiting organization’s “Hall of Fame.” It is from this experience and knowledge that he wrote The Motivated Job Search.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Networking Business Cards

This is the next installment of our discussion regarding the use of business cards during a job search. We’ll be discussing Networking Business Cards.

Networking Business Cards

Networking business cards contain the same key contact information as a traditional card, except this variety also has a title and a concise statement regarding your career focus and unique value proposition or brand. Remember to keep the messaging consistent between your networking card, your elevator speech, your LinkedIn profile, your resume, and so on. With some variations, the theme of these job-seeking tools must align.

Award-Winning, Population Health Management Sales Professional

Bob Johnson National Sales Executive

(Followed by contact information)

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Introduction

Having a business card during a job search is a necessity.  Circumstances will present themselves where providing a resume is awkward or inappropriate. Getting a business card should be toward the top of your job search to-do list.

There are four different approaches to the standard three-and-a-half inch by two-inch business card for a job search: traditional business cards, networking business cards, resume business cards, and infographic business cards.

To determine the best business card approach for your needs, consider this key factor: Which would be best received by a networking contact or the hiring executive for your level of position?

It’s easy to get sidetracked when creating business cards, especially networking, resume, and infographic versions.  Resist that urge. Don’t overanalyze. Once you choose one of these types, just remember: the messaging behind your brand and elevator speech, and the information on your card, must match.

A solid case can be made for getting two sets of cards to use in different settings: traditional for truly social events, and a networking or resume card for job networking events.

In this multi-part posting, we will briefly discuss each kind of job search business card. Let’s start with the traditional business card.

Traditional Business Cards

This business card is simple in design. It contains only your name, city of residence, (street address is optional), telephone number(s), email address, and LinkedIn profile address. It is used for information exchange purposes only. 

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Prepare Variations

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Prepare a few variations.

You might want to say things differently to a colleague than you would to a friend at a social gathering. Sometimes you’ll just have fifteen seconds for your speech, and in other situations you might have a full minute.

Focus on mastering a few key talking points, and then work up ways to customize your speech for particular situations. Much of this will happen naturally as you speak with people (as long as you remember your talking points).

Use the word count feature on your computer to create shorter and longer versions. A good rule of thumb is that you can comfortably say about 150 words in sixty seconds.

Remember, the purpose of an elevator speech is to quickly inform the listener of your value proposition as a professional and begin a conversation. Putting these tips into action is the real trick. Check out these websites that contain scores of elevator speeches (not all are designed for job seekers) for a variety of industries: www.improvandy.com and www.yourelevatorpitch.net.

Example

Employee Benefits Account Management Professional

“I am an employee benefits account management professional that helps businesses control their healthcare and insurance costs. My expertise is in medical self-funding and population health management. I have a documented track record of retaining existing clients; in fact, over the last five years I have a 96% retention rate with my client base. I want to make a career move to an organization looking to expand its market share and retain business in the self-funded arena.”

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Practice, practice, practice – and solicit feedback

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Practice, practice, practice—and solicit feedback.

After reading your speech aloud, tinker with the words (the goal is to have a speech that sounds authentic and confident). Now, memorize the speech and rehearse it in front of a mirror (or use the video recording capabilities of your computer or smartphone). You need to see and hear how you sound. Granted, this might feel awkward at first, but the more you practice, the smoother (and more conversational) your delivery will be. Smiling while saying the words will increase the impact of the speech. Project your voice so those listening will clearly hear and understand.

Continue tweaking your speech until it no longer sounds rehearsed. When polished to your satisfaction, try the speech out on a few friends. Make eye contact, smile, and deliver your message with confidence. Afterward, ask them what they thought your key points were. If their response doesn’t square with your objective, the speech still needs work.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.