Business Cards During a Job Search – Resume Business Cards

This is the next installment of our discussion regarding the use of business cards during a job search. We’ll be discussing Resume Business Cards.

Resume Business Cards

A resume business card takes the networking card one step further (See previous post). Here you may expand descriptive information on the front of the card, and put key qualifications and accomplishments on the back. Focus on your top two or three accomplishments (or qualifications), not on job titles or duties.

This next point is optional, but leave a little white space at the bottom of the back of the card, allowing the recipient room to jot a note about you. Hopefully the note will read, “Need to call.”

It’s fine to mix and match the concepts of the three forms of business cards (Traditional, Networking, and Resume). For example, you may determine that it would be best received by your target audience that the front of the card has a traditional look. But, on the back, you may choose to put a branding statement and a couple of achievements.  That’s fine. Exercise your best business judgement.

This topic is covered in more detail in The Motivated Job Search. You can check out the book on Amazon.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Networking Business Cards

This is the next installment of our discussion regarding the use of business cards during a job search. We’ll be discussing Networking Business Cards.

Networking Business Cards

Networking business cards contain the same key contact information as a traditional card, except this variety also has a title and a concise statement regarding your career focus and unique value proposition or brand. Remember to keep the messaging consistent between your networking card, your elevator speech, your LinkedIn profile, your resume, and so on. With some variations, the theme of these job-seeking tools must align.

Award-Winning, Population Health Management Sales Professional

Bob Johnson National Sales Executive

(Followed by contact information)

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Introduction

Having a business card during a job search is a necessity.  Circumstances will present themselves where providing a resume is awkward or inappropriate. Getting a business card should be toward the top of your job search to-do list.

There are four different approaches to the standard three-and-a-half inch by two-inch business card for a job search: traditional business cards, networking business cards, resume business cards, and infographic business cards.

To determine the best business card approach for your needs, consider this key factor: Which would be best received by a networking contact or the hiring executive for your level of position?

It’s easy to get sidetracked when creating business cards, especially networking, resume, and infographic versions.  Resist that urge. Don’t overanalyze. Once you choose one of these types, just remember: the messaging behind your brand and elevator speech, and the information on your card, must match.

A solid case can be made for getting two sets of cards to use in different settings: traditional for truly social events, and a networking or resume card for job networking events.

In this multi-part posting, we will briefly discuss each kind of job search business card. Let’s start with the traditional business card.

Traditional Business Cards

This business card is simple in design. It contains only your name, city of residence, (street address is optional), telephone number(s), email address, and LinkedIn profile address. It is used for information exchange purposes only. 

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Write your speech (after you have outlined it)

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Write your speech.

Now that you have ideas and concepts about yourself to promote (your outline), begin drafting your speech’s initial version. Here are some steps to guide you.

  1. Identify yourself by function.
  2. Statement regarding your value proposition as a professional.
  3. Accomplishment or proof statement that supports your value proposition as a professional.
  4. Call to action in the form of a subtle invitation to have a conversation.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Outline your speech

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Outline your speech.

Give yourself some time to ponder the ideas and concepts you may include in your speech. Don’t rush. It isn’t necessary to start drafting the speech immediately, but begin with notes reminding you of your bottom-line message. Don’t worry about proper grammar and complete sentences yet. The objective is to gather concepts and ideas first, so be careful not to edit yourself. Refer to your branding words.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.