How to Re-ignite a Stagnant Job Search – Get out! And use job alerts.

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to re-ignite a stagnant job search.

Get Out!  Go meet people.  Network face-to-face.  Attend functions.  Attend local industry gatherings.  Consider attending national industry conferences.  This can be a bonanza of networking opportunities.  Don’t curl up in a ball and hide! Instead, get out and meet people.  They’ll help you if they can if you give them the opportunity to do so.

Job Alerts.  If you have not been using job alerts, do so now (Indeed.com, SimplyHired.com, LinkedIn, job boards).  If you have, review them.  Change then.  Add new ones to include other jobs you are interested in and qualified for.  Get a new flow of information on opportunities in the market.

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For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

How to Re-ignite a Stagnant Job Search – Networking – Focus on New Connections

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to re-ignite a stagnant job search. In the previous postings we have discussed learning something new as a first step followed by critically evaluating your resume, and keeping a positive attitude. Let’s continue the topic by discussing networking.

Networking. You’ve likely networked with your connections as a part of your search.  To re-ignite your networking efforts, start making new connections, especially on LinkedIn.  Focus on new connections that you believe may be able to help or hire you.  For every two new connections (or LinkedIn invitations extended), contact an existing networking contact and bring them up to speed on your job search (or any other relevant topic).  For all new connections, wait a few days, and then communicate with them. Speak with them about their company, their position within their organization, and any leads they may know of.  Going through this process will expand your network and lead to new conversations with new contacts while touching base with your existing network.

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For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

How to Re-ignite a Stagnant Job Search – Your Attitude

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to re-ignite a stagnant job search.

Attitude.  Shake off the disappointments of the past.  Get over it and “out of yourself”.  Today is a new day!  Staying in a pity party serves no purpose. Besides, you’re going to change what you’ve been doing to more productive activities.  You have reason to be optimistic!  Things are about to change because you are going to use new strategies to create job search activities.  It will be work, but the results will be different.  But, it all starts with your attitude.  Get positive.  Be positive.  Do what needs to be done (with a smile despite momentary setbacks) and you will begin to experience positive results!

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For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

How to Re-ignite a Stagnant Job Search – Critically Evaluate Your Resume

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to re-ignite a stagnant job search. In the first post we discussed that learning something new is an important step in reviving a stale job search.  Let’s continue the discussion.

Resume. Critically evaluate your resume.  Does it present “you” persuasively? Be critical and honest with your evaluation. If you wrote your resume yourself, seriously consider contacting a professional resume writer and have it evaluated.  Could improvements in content and formatting be worth the cost to have it re-done?  Having a new resume is a change that can improve your confidence during your search.

Don’t forget, any changes to your resume should also be reflected on your LinkedIn profile, too!

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© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

How to Re-ignite a Stagnant Job Search – Start By Learning Something New

You’re engaged in a job search and things have slowed to a crawl.  You’ve done everything you know and no results.  Don’t panic.  There are practical steps you can take that can re-ignite your job search and get you back on track.

In this multi-part posting we will discuss some practical steps you can take to re-ignite a stale job search.

Learn something new.  This may not sound like a tactic to re-ignite a job search, but it is…..and, it’s a big one.  You need to stimulate your mind with new information.  Identify a professional designation and start the work to achieve it.  If you need to improve your technology skills, now is the time to do it.  Whatever you learn stimulates the mind and when completed, can differentiate you from other job seekers.

Read up on job search techniques. Could you learn something that could open the door to more opportunities?

Many job seekers find renewed energy and a more optimistic outlook on a stale search when they begin learning new things.  You feel better knowing you are doing something to move your job search forward.

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© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Starting Your Job Search – Getting Off to a Successful Start – Job Alerts – Conclusion

This is the last installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to start a job search. Previous posts have discussed your emotions when starting a job search, getting organized, creating a short list of target employers and networking contacts, and updating your resume and LinkedIn profile.

Create job alerts. Use websites like Indeed.com and SimplyHired.com. You can choose to be alerted about titles, locations, specific companies (your short list), and so on. Set up alerts on LinkedIn too. Companies (and recruiters) post jobs on LinkedIn and you can receive notifications when they do. Are there any industry-specific or niche job boards you could search? Get a sense of the job market, and start the flow of opportunities you are looking for. If a position pops up, and you’re interested, do not apply for it through the website! Research the likely hiring executive(s) and contact them directly.

Starting a job search can easily be overwhelming, especially if you didn’t expect to become unemployed or need to find a new job. If you follow the steps outlined in these series of posts on Starting Your Job Search, you will be able to successfully launch your job search and reduce any feelings of anxiety.

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© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Starting Your Job Search – Getting Off to a Successful Start – Update Resume and LinkedIn Profile -Part 5

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to start a job search. Previous posts have discussed your emotions when starting a job search, getting organized, creating a short list of target employers and networking contacts. This post will discuss updating your resume, LinkedIn profile, and expanding your network.

Update your resume. Update your resume. Either prepare one yourself, or seek professional services (which will free your time for other job search activities). If you have an out-of-date resume, having your resume professionally done could be a good investment.

Update your LinkedIn profile and expand your network. Update your LinkedIn profile. Make sure your resume and LinkedIn profile are in sync with each other. Most importantly, your former employers and dates of employment must match exactly. Make sure your profile is complete, optimized, and compelling. Work towards expanding your network by adding one hundred new connections (it’s not as hard as you may think). Make them the right kind of high-value connections that will significantly advance your job search (people that can hire you or help you or both).

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© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Starting Your Job Search – Getting Off to a Successful Start – Short List of Networking Contacts – Part 4

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to start a job search. Previous posts have discussed your emotions when starting a job search, getting organized, and creating a short list of target employers.

Create a short list of networking contacts. Just like the list of companies from the last step, make a list of close, professional colleagues you feel very comfortable speaking to about your circumstances and job search. As you think of more, add them to the list. This list is unlikely to exceed twenty to twenty-five names to begin with (although it could be more). After you make out the list, do not contact them! You are not ready (even though you may think you are!). Regardless of your business or personal relationships here, don’t “blow it” by not being properly prepared. Patience. Get prepared and know what you want to say before reaching out.

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© 2015 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this post may be reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Starting Your Job Search – Getting Off to a Successful Start – Short List of Target Employers – Part 3

This is the third installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to start a job search. Previous posts have discussed your emotions when starting a job search and getting organized. This post will discuss creating a short list of targeted companies.

Create a short list of target employers you would be interested in working for. It may be only three, five, or ten companies. Add to the list as you discover new companies. But the point here is to start the list and get you thinking. Now, look up the companies on LinkedIn. Follow them by setting up alerts to receive news, press releases, and job postings. Google Alerts may also be used. If you have Twitter, follow the companies (check out Twellow at www.twellow.com and Wefollow at www.wefollow.com) to receive information/tweets. This starts the flow of information from these companies (and others you’ll add), including jobs and industry trends, which will benefit your job search. Add this information to your Excel spreadsheets to create a complete picture of each company before moving ahead, to eliminate needless backtracking for additional research.

© 2015 Brian Howard. All rights reserved.

Starting Your Job Search – Getting Off to a Successful Start – Part 2

This is the second installment of a multi-part posting discussing how to start a job search.

Get organized. You will need to make lists—of companies, people, and “to-do” lists. Think through how you will keep track of everything. Relying on your memory or sticky-notes in a shotgun fashion is a recipe for disaster. In the thick of your job search, you won’t be able to keep track of what you’re doing without a system. Excel spreadsheets are highly recommended for creating lists of companies and people. Only create columns for the information you will really need (name of contact, company, company website, email address, phone number, date contacted). Don’t get carried away recording non-useful information. There are commercial services that can help you stay organized in your job search. Check out JibberJobber (www.jibberjobber.com). Microsoft Outlook’s calendar feature can also help. You can record tasks to be done, schedule follow-up calls, and so on.

© 2015 Brian Howard. All rights reserved.