Brian Howard’s Podcast Interview on Career Cloud Radio Discussing The Motivated Job Search

“The most effective and efficient job search strategy is a self-motivated approach. This is a proactive approach where the job seeker actively engages the job market to discover opportunities where their skills and competencies bring the greatest value to an employer.”

-Brian Howard

In this podcast interview (link), Chris Russell of Career Cloud Radio asks Brian about the following topics and more.

  • What does the job market look like from where you sit…
  • How can candidates get off to a successful start in their job search?
  • How much does your attitude figure in?
  • Your Career . . . Your Responsibility
  • Understanding the Employer’s Mindset
  • What’s an Exit Statement…and how to use it.
  • Resume tips
  • What Recruiters Can and Cannot Do for You
  • How to find a good recruiter…what to look for?
  • General rules around proactively marketing yourself in a job search
  • Unique tactics…what’s a brag book?

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Outline your speech

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Outline your speech.

Give yourself some time to ponder the ideas and concepts you may include in your speech. Don’t rush. It isn’t necessary to start drafting the speech immediately, but begin with notes reminding you of your bottom-line message. Don’t worry about proper grammar and complete sentences yet. The objective is to gather concepts and ideas first, so be careful not to edit yourself. Refer to your branding words.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Know what your value proposition is

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Know what your Value Proposition is.

This is where your branding comes into full play. Identify as precisely as possible what you offer, what problems you can solve, and what benefits you bring to an employer.

If you are a tenured job seeker, think of achievements and statements that could be woven into your elevator speech that could attack an age bias, such as instituting a new technology or taking on a project that required extra effort or extra hours of work.

“Try not to become a man of success. Rather become a man of value.” — Albert Einstein

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For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Know Your Target Audience

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Know your target audience.

This single factor will give your speech the most impact. For example, if you’re targeting a CEO position and you will be speaking to members of the board of directors, you want your elevator speech to include statements of vision, direction, strategy, profitability, and shareholder value (especially for publicly traded companies).

If your target position is in operations and the hiring executive is the COO, you want your elevator speech to include concepts such as efficiency and operational savings.

Finally, if your target position is in sales and the hiring executive will be the director or vice president of sales, you want your elevator speech to contain information about new business sales and sales goal attainment.

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© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Purpose

The elevator speech is a critical component to your job search. By definition, an elevator speech is a 30-second speech that summarizes who you are, what you do, and why you’d be a perfect candidate.  In essence, it is your personal commercial.

In this multi-part posting, we will discuss the critical elements of a elevator speech as used in a job search.

The purpose of your elevator speech is to grab the listener’s attention, quickly provide relevant information, and initiate conversation. A crisply delivered elevator speech is a differentiator from other job seekers. While others may struggle and stumble, you will be able to concisely inform the listener about your professional value proposition (brand).

Develop a handful of variations for different situations, including all forms of networking, interviews, association and industry conferences, and strictly social gatherings. This will be easy to do once you get your talking-points memorized.

Please comment.

For daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Infographic Resumes – Some Additional Considerations – Continued

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the considerations and use of an infographic resume as a tool in your job search. Let’s continue by discussing some additional considerations of using an infographic resume in your job search.

It must look great! Not just good, but great! If you pursue this differentiation tactic, the final product must have a “wow” factor…a “holy cow this is really cool” factor. Otherwise, it will not have the persuasive and differentiating effect you are looking for. It is highly recommended that, should you pursue this job search tactic, you hire a professional to create it. Creating the document on your own can take countless hours. Time better spent pursuing other job search activities – networking, marketing your professional credentials, and so on.

A few final thoughts. One interesting concept you could explore is creating an infographic section to your traditional resume. This would be a form of a showcase resume using color and graphics as your showcase section. Then, traditional resume information would follow.

If you create an infographic resume, get it out there! Use it! One easy thing to do is attach it to your LinkedIn profile. Obviously you want to have it and hand it out during networking events and as a supplement to interviews. Since you put in the time, effort, thought, and money into this tactic, look for ways to leverage it in your job search activities.

Caution. Creating an infographic resume can be a distraction. Its creation can easily become busy-work that distracts you from the real tasks of moving your job search forward. Be aware of your time and use it wisely. An Infographic resume is a differentiator, but it will not by itself get you a job.

Discovering examples of infographic resumes and professionals (vendors) that create them is as simple as a Google search for “infographic resumes.”

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Infographic Resumes – Now, The Disadvantages

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the considerations and use of an infographic resume as a tool in your job search. The previous post discussed the advantages of an infographic resume. Let’s continue by discussing some disadvantages of using an infographic resume in your job search.

How will it be Received by Hiring Executives for Positions You are Pursuing? This is a serious consideration. An infographic resume is a neat idea and can be very intriguing. It can open your mind to all sorts of creative thoughts on how to present your information. This is especially true once you start viewing examples. However, it is not the right or most impactful strategy for every industry or position. Only you can gauge the receptiveness and persuasive influence an infographic resume would have on hiring executives in your job search.

It must Contain Impactful Information. If an infographic resume does not have impactful or persuasive information or is poorly constructed, it will hurt your job search. It can be a distraction, reflect poorly on your candidacy for the job, or eliminate you from contention for the position.

This is where it is highly recommended that you speak to professionals that create these documents. Seek their opinion as to whether you have the caliber of career information and accomplishments to have an impactful infographic resume (with the understanding that they will have the incentive for you to buy their services). Seek out examples of others like you with similar backgrounds (if possible). Set aside any thoughts you have about the uniqueness of the approach and objectively evaluate whether you have the kind of career information that would make for a compelling infographic resume.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Infographic Resumes – The Advantages – Continued

infographic resume sampleThis is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the considerations and use of an infographic resume as a tool in your job search. Let’s continue the discussion regarding the advantages of using an infographic resume in your job search.

Insight into Your Thinking and Presentation Skills. One interesting advantage to an infographic resume is it reveals how you present information. It opens the door of insight into how you think and creatively present ideas and concepts. This can be very persuasive if the positions you are pursuing require presentation skills.

Vividly Presents Your Professional Background. Infographic resumes are colorful, high resolution documents. Unlike your LinkedIn profile (which is an online template) and your resume (which has expected and accepted sections), an infographic resume is a blank canvass. It is a platform to creatively present your professional background and accomplishments. You can present yourself in any way you choose using color and graphics.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

 

Infographic Resumes – The Advantages

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the considerations and use of an infographic resume as a tool in your job search.

There are advantages, disadvantages, and considerations for using an infographic resume in a job search. Let’s start with some advantages.

Differentiation. Infographic resume is clearly a differentiation tactic. Although the idea of a infographic resume has been around for a while, they are not widely used and therefore seldom seen by hiring executives in most industries. A well-thought, well-prepared, and well-presented infographic resume can make you stand out compared to other job seekers.

A Networking Tool. A infographic resume can be a very impactful networking tool. Instead of, or used in conjunction with, your traditional resume and business cards, an infographic resume can be shared at networking functions.

One unique approach would be selecting your most persuasive achievements and create an infographic “hand bill.” Create a 4×6 infographic hand bill and put it on thicker paper or as a large business card. This is truly unique and seldom seen. It will create conversation.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Infographic Resumes – Introduction

An infographic resume is a colorful, high resolution document that visually presents your background and accomplishments by using pie charts, bar graphs, time lines, and other graphics  in very creative ways. They can be particularly impactful to display notable achievements, high-level recommendations, patterns of success among other things.

In this multi-part posting, we will discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and considerations of using an infographic resume (and other derivative ideas) in your job search.

The impact of an infographic resume comes from the fact that readers are drawn to colorful images. It grabs their attention which is precisely the differentiation you want in a competitive job market. There’s a tendency to remember things better when they are presented by images.

An infographic resume can, in limited circumstances, replace the traditional resume. This is most often the case in the creative fields like design, marketing, advertising, digital media, and so on.

However, for most, an infographic resume should be used as a supplement or differentiation tactic in conjunction with a traditional resume. Even then, its use is better suited for some positions (sales, for example) than others. With these caveats, an infographic resume can be a persuasive tool in your job search arsenal.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.