Business Cards During a Job Search – Infographic Business Cards

Infographic Business Cards

An infographic business card is a very unique concept. It is not a “business card” in the traditional sense. Instead, it is more of a “networking handbill.” In concept, an infographic business card is a colorful, high resolution document containing impactful and persuasive background information and accomplishments presented through pie charts and bar graphs of creative design.

Conceptually, an infographic business card is larger than the standard three-and-a-half inch by two-inch business card. Although there is no rule, a four-by-six inch card is a good size or starting point.

The infographic business card is ideal for networking events, especially for association gatherings and conventions. Printed on business card grade paper, with colorful graphics, it is a clear differentiator. If not too large, it can still easily slip into an inside jacket pocket or portfolio of a networking contact or hiring executive.

It is highly recommended that you use the services of a professional with experience creating infographic resumes. There are advantages and disadvantages that need to be carefully considered before you pursue this job search tactic.

This topic is covered in more detail in The Motivated Job Search. You can also check out the book on Amazon.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Resume Business Cards

This is the next installment of our discussion regarding the use of business cards during a job search. We’ll be discussing Resume Business Cards.

Resume Business Cards

A resume business card takes the networking card one step further (See previous post). Here you may expand descriptive information on the front of the card, and put key qualifications and accomplishments on the back. Focus on your top two or three accomplishments (or qualifications), not on job titles or duties.

This next point is optional, but leave a little white space at the bottom of the back of the card, allowing the recipient room to jot a note about you. Hopefully the note will read, “Need to call.”

It’s fine to mix and match the concepts of the three forms of business cards (Traditional, Networking, and Resume). For example, you may determine that it would be best received by your target audience that the front of the card has a traditional look. But, on the back, you may choose to put a branding statement and a couple of achievements.  That’s fine. Exercise your best business judgement.

This topic is covered in more detail in The Motivated Job Search. You can check out the book on Amazon.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – The Networking Business Card

Networking Business Cards

Networking business cards contain the same key contact information as a traditional card, except this variety also has a title and a concise statement regarding your career focus and unique value proposition or brand. Remember to keep the messaging consistent between your networking card, your elevator speech, your LinkedIn profile, your resume, and so on. With some variations, the theme of these job-seeking tools must align. 

This topic is covered in more detail in The Motivated Job Search. You can also check out the book on Amazon.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Now Available! The Motivated Job Search book

I am pleased to announce the release of The Motivated Job Search book!

I wrote The Motivated Job Search for career-minded professionals who want simple and direct answers on how to conduct a job search.

Most job seekers do not know how to effectively conduct a job search in today’s job market, which is completely understandable. The skills to find a job are not exactly top-of-mind. The Motivated Job Search takes you through a step-by-step job search process and teaches you how to stand out and get the job you want!

The Motivated Job Search covers meaningful topics like how to correctly prepare for a job search, profiling your next job, understanding the employer’s mind, branding, elevator speech, success stories, LinkedIn, networking, social media, and how to penetrate the hidden job market, along with a myriad of useful job search tools not otherwise written about in other job search books. The book promotes a self-motivated job search approach where job seekers proactively engage the job market and employers in meaningful ways that result in job offers!

Check out the book on Amazon, or purchase it directly (most cost effective way) from the publisher, WriteLife Publishing (an imprint of BQB Publishing Company).

 

About the Author: Brian Howard is a Certified Career Management Coach (CCMC), a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS), a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW), and an actively practicing executive recruiter. He has helped thousands of job seekers over the course of his career. With over 23 years of real world recruiting experience, he has received various accolades and international acclaim for his recruiting ability, and is a member of an international recruiting organization’s “Hall of Fame.” It is from this experience and knowledge that he wrote The Motivated Job Search.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Networking Business Cards

This is the next installment of our discussion regarding the use of business cards during a job search. We’ll be discussing Networking Business Cards.

Networking Business Cards

Networking business cards contain the same key contact information as a traditional card, except this variety also has a title and a concise statement regarding your career focus and unique value proposition or brand. Remember to keep the messaging consistent between your networking card, your elevator speech, your LinkedIn profile, your resume, and so on. With some variations, the theme of these job-seeking tools must align.

Award-Winning, Population Health Management Sales Professional

Bob Johnson National Sales Executive

(Followed by contact information)

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Introduction

Having a business card during a job search is a necessity.  Circumstances will present themselves where providing a resume is awkward or inappropriate. Getting a business card should be toward the top of your job search to-do list.

There are four different approaches to the standard three-and-a-half inch by two-inch business card for a job search: traditional business cards, networking business cards, resume business cards, and infographic business cards.

To determine the best business card approach for your needs, consider this key factor: Which would be best received by a networking contact or the hiring executive for your level of position?

It’s easy to get sidetracked when creating business cards, especially networking, resume, and infographic versions.  Resist that urge. Don’t overanalyze. Once you choose one of these types, just remember: the messaging behind your brand and elevator speech, and the information on your card, must match.

A solid case can be made for getting two sets of cards to use in different settings: traditional for truly social events, and a networking or resume card for job networking events.

In this multi-part posting, we will briefly discuss each kind of job search business card. Let’s start with the traditional business card.

Traditional Business Cards

This business card is simple in design. It contains only your name, city of residence, (street address is optional), telephone number(s), email address, and LinkedIn profile address. It is used for information exchange purposes only. 

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.