Now Available! The Motivated Job Search book

I am pleased to announce the release of The Motivated Job Search book!

I wrote The Motivated Job Search for career-minded professionals who want simple and direct answers on how to conduct a job search.

Most job seekers do not know how to effectively conduct a job search in today’s job market, which is completely understandable. The skills to find a job are not exactly top-of-mind. The Motivated Job Search takes you through a step-by-step job search process and teaches you how to stand out and get the job you want!

The Motivated Job Search covers meaningful topics like how to correctly prepare for a job search, profiling your next job, understanding the employer’s mind, branding, elevator speech, success stories, LinkedIn, networking, social media, and how to penetrate the hidden job market, along with a myriad of useful job search tools not otherwise written about in other job search books. The book promotes a self-motivated job search approach where job seekers proactively engage the job market and employers in meaningful ways that result in job offers!

Check out the book on Amazon, or purchase it directly (most cost effective way) from the publisher, WriteLife Publishing (an imprint of BQB Publishing Company).

 

About the Author: Brian Howard is a Certified Career Management Coach (CCMC), a Certified Job Search Strategist (CJSS), a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW), and an actively practicing executive recruiter. He has helped thousands of job seekers over the course of his career. With over 23 years of real world recruiting experience, he has received various accolades and international acclaim for his recruiting ability, and is a member of an international recruiting organization’s “Hall of Fame.” It is from this experience and knowledge that he wrote The Motivated Job Search.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Networking Business Cards

This is the next installment of our discussion regarding the use of business cards during a job search. We’ll be discussing Networking Business Cards.

Networking Business Cards

Networking business cards contain the same key contact information as a traditional card, except this variety also has a title and a concise statement regarding your career focus and unique value proposition or brand. Remember to keep the messaging consistent between your networking card, your elevator speech, your LinkedIn profile, your resume, and so on. With some variations, the theme of these job-seeking tools must align.

Award-Winning, Population Health Management Sales Professional

Bob Johnson National Sales Executive

(Followed by contact information)

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Business Cards During a Job Search – Introduction

Having a business card during a job search is a necessity.  Circumstances will present themselves where providing a resume is awkward or inappropriate. Getting a business card should be toward the top of your job search to-do list.

There are four different approaches to the standard three-and-a-half inch by two-inch business card for a job search: traditional business cards, networking business cards, resume business cards, and infographic business cards.

To determine the best business card approach for your needs, consider this key factor: Which would be best received by a networking contact or the hiring executive for your level of position?

It’s easy to get sidetracked when creating business cards, especially networking, resume, and infographic versions.  Resist that urge. Don’t overanalyze. Once you choose one of these types, just remember: the messaging behind your brand and elevator speech, and the information on your card, must match.

A solid case can be made for getting two sets of cards to use in different settings: traditional for truly social events, and a networking or resume card for job networking events.

In this multi-part posting, we will briefly discuss each kind of job search business card. Let’s start with the traditional business card.

Traditional Business Cards

This business card is simple in design. It contains only your name, city of residence, (street address is optional), telephone number(s), email address, and LinkedIn profile address. It is used for information exchange purposes only. 

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Prepare Variations

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Prepare a few variations.

You might want to say things differently to a colleague than you would to a friend at a social gathering. Sometimes you’ll just have fifteen seconds for your speech, and in other situations you might have a full minute.

Focus on mastering a few key talking points, and then work up ways to customize your speech for particular situations. Much of this will happen naturally as you speak with people (as long as you remember your talking points).

Use the word count feature on your computer to create shorter and longer versions. A good rule of thumb is that you can comfortably say about 150 words in sixty seconds.

Remember, the purpose of an elevator speech is to quickly inform the listener of your value proposition as a professional and begin a conversation. Putting these tips into action is the real trick. Check out these websites that contain scores of elevator speeches (not all are designed for job seekers) for a variety of industries: www.improvandy.com and www.yourelevatorpitch.net.

Example

Employee Benefits Account Management Professional

“I am an employee benefits account management professional that helps businesses control their healthcare and insurance costs. My expertise is in medical self-funding and population health management. I have a documented track record of retaining existing clients; in fact, over the last five years I have a 96% retention rate with my client base. I want to make a career move to an organization looking to expand its market share and retain business in the self-funded arena.”

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.