Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Practice, practice, practice – and solicit feedback

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Practice, practice, practice—and solicit feedback.

After reading your speech aloud, tinker with the words (the goal is to have a speech that sounds authentic and confident). Now, memorize the speech and rehearse it in front of a mirror (or use the video recording capabilities of your computer or smartphone). You need to see and hear how you sound. Granted, this might feel awkward at first, but the more you practice, the smoother (and more conversational) your delivery will be. Smiling while saying the words will increase the impact of the speech. Project your voice so those listening will clearly hear and understand.

Continue tweaking your speech until it no longer sounds rehearsed. When polished to your satisfaction, try the speech out on a few friends. Make eye contact, smile, and deliver your message with confidence. Afterward, ask them what they thought your key points were. If their response doesn’t square with your objective, the speech still needs work.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Tailor the speech to them, not you!

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Tailor the speech to them, not you.

Remember that the people listening to your speech will have their antennas tuned to WIIFM (What’s In It For Me?). So, refer to what you have written to ensure your message addresses their potential needs.

For example, this introduction: “I am a human resources professional with ten years of experience working for consumer products companies,” would be more powerful this way: “I am a human resources professional with a strong track record in helping identify and recruit top-level sales talent.” Hear the difference? Hear the branding?

Using benefit-focused terminology will help convince a listener that you have the experience and skills to get the job done at his or her company.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Write your speech (after you have outlined it)

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Write your speech.

Now that you have ideas and concepts about yourself to promote (your outline), begin drafting your speech’s initial version. Here are some steps to guide you.

  1. Identify yourself by function.
  2. Statement regarding your value proposition as a professional.
  3. Accomplishment or proof statement that supports your value proposition as a professional.
  4. Call to action in the form of a subtle invitation to have a conversation.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Brian Howard’s Podcast Interview on Career Cloud Radio Discussing The Motivated Job Search

“The most effective and efficient job search strategy is a self-motivated approach. This is a proactive approach where the job seeker actively engages the job market to discover opportunities where their skills and competencies bring the greatest value to an employer.”

-Brian Howard

In this podcast interview (link), Chris Russell of Career Cloud Radio asks Brian about the following topics and more.

  • What does the job market look like from where you sit…
  • How can candidates get off to a successful start in their job search?
  • How much does your attitude figure in?
  • Your Career . . . Your Responsibility
  • Understanding the Employer’s Mindset
  • What’s an Exit Statement…and how to use it.
  • Resume tips
  • What Recruiters Can and Cannot Do for You
  • How to find a good recruiter…what to look for?
  • General rules around proactively marketing yourself in a job search
  • Unique tactics…what’s a brag book?

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Outline your speech

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Outline your speech.

Give yourself some time to ponder the ideas and concepts you may include in your speech. Don’t rush. It isn’t necessary to start drafting the speech immediately, but begin with notes reminding you of your bottom-line message. Don’t worry about proper grammar and complete sentences yet. The objective is to gather concepts and ideas first, so be careful not to edit yourself. Refer to your branding words.

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.