Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Know what your value proposition is

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Know what your Value Proposition is.

This is where your branding comes into full play. Identify as precisely as possible what you offer, what problems you can solve, and what benefits you bring to an employer.

If you are a tenured job seeker, think of achievements and statements that could be woven into your elevator speech that could attack an age bias, such as instituting a new technology or taking on a project that required extra effort or extra hours of work.

“Try not to become a man of success. Rather become a man of value.” — Albert Einstein

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© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Know Your Target Audience

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the development and use of an elevator speech as used in a job search.

Know your target audience.

This single factor will give your speech the most impact. For example, if you’re targeting a CEO position and you will be speaking to members of the board of directors, you want your elevator speech to include statements of vision, direction, strategy, profitability, and shareholder value (especially for publicly traded companies).

If your target position is in operations and the hiring executive is the COO, you want your elevator speech to include concepts such as efficiency and operational savings.

Finally, if your target position is in sales and the hiring executive will be the director or vice president of sales, you want your elevator speech to contain information about new business sales and sales goal attainment.

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© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Elevator Speech in a Job Search – Purpose

The elevator speech is a critical component to your job search. By definition, an elevator speech is a 30-second speech that summarizes who you are, what you do, and why you’d be a perfect candidate.  In essence, it is your personal commercial.

In this multi-part posting, we will discuss the critical elements of a elevator speech as used in a job search.

The purpose of your elevator speech is to grab the listener’s attention, quickly provide relevant information, and initiate conversation. A crisply delivered elevator speech is a differentiator from other job seekers. While others may struggle and stumble, you will be able to concisely inform the listener about your professional value proposition (brand).

Develop a handful of variations for different situations, including all forms of networking, interviews, association and industry conferences, and strictly social gatherings. This will be easy to do once you get your talking-points memorized.

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© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.

Infographic Resumes – Some Additional Considerations – Continued

This is the next installment of a multi-part posting discussing the considerations and use of an infographic resume as a tool in your job search. Let’s continue by discussing some additional considerations of using an infographic resume in your job search.

It must look great! Not just good, but great! If you pursue this differentiation tactic, the final product must have a “wow” factor…a “holy cow this is really cool” factor. Otherwise, it will not have the persuasive and differentiating effect you are looking for. It is highly recommended that, should you pursue this job search tactic, you hire a professional to create it. Creating the document on your own can take countless hours. Time better spent pursuing other job search activities – networking, marketing your professional credentials, and so on.

A few final thoughts. One interesting concept you could explore is creating an infographic section to your traditional resume. This would be a form of a showcase resume using color and graphics as your showcase section. Then, traditional resume information would follow.

If you create an infographic resume, get it out there! Use it! One easy thing to do is attach it to your LinkedIn profile. Obviously you want to have it and hand it out during networking events and as a supplement to interviews. Since you put in the time, effort, thought, and money into this tactic, look for ways to leverage it in your job search activities.

Caution. Creating an infographic resume can be a distraction. Its creation can easily become busy-work that distracts you from the real tasks of moving your job search forward. Be aware of your time and use it wisely. An Infographic resume is a differentiator, but it will not by itself get you a job.

Discovering examples of infographic resumes and professionals (vendors) that create them is as simple as a Google search for “infographic resumes.”

Please comment.

For (almost) daily job search thoughts, follow me on Twitter: @bhowardauthor

© 2016 Brian E. Howard. All rights reserved. No part of the content of this response or post may be used or reproduced in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, digital, photocopying, or recording, without the expressed written permission from the author.