Brian Howard Interviewed and Discusses His Recent Book, Motivated Resumes and LinkedIn Profiles

Brian Howard was recently interviewed on CareerMetis discussing his book, Motivated Resumes and LinkedIn Profiles. You can listen to the interview on the CareerMetis website, as well as YouTube, and SoundCloud.

This is the fifth book in the Motivated Series of job search books. Other books in the series include: The Motivated Job Search, The Motivated Networker, The Motivated Job Search Workbook, and Over 50 and Motivated.

You can purchase Motivated Resumes and LinkedIn Profiles, as well as the other books in the series, on Amazon.

Now Available as an Audio Book! – The Motivated Networker

The Motivated Networker is now available as an audio book! The audio version of the book can be found on Amazon or Audible.

The Motivated Networker has been endorsed by Dr. Ivan Misner, Founder of BNI (Business Network International) – The world’s largest business networking organization. Dr. Misner has been dubbed “The Father of Modern Networking” and is one of the world’s leading experts in business networking.

“The Motivated Networker is the most comprehensive networking book on the market on how to use networking to find a job. Well-written, thoroughly researched, and practical, The Motivated Networker covers important networking topics and introduces the “ICE” Method for job search networking. It is a must-hear for all job seekers!” – Dr. Ivan Misner

The Motivated Networker is a part of The Motivated Series of job search books.

Employment Perks versus Monetary Compensation

There is a growing trend indicating that U.S. employers are re-evaluating how they compensate their employees. Employers are finding ways of using perks and benefits instead of monetary compensation. The motivation could be driven by the fact that these perks cost less than pay raises. Another plausible explanation is employers have learned what makes their job and company appealing through use of these creative perks. Employees forego exploring job changes because they like the perks their current employer offers.

There is a (logical) split among employees in their view of these creative perks. Those at the lower end of the pay scale may not be as interested because they have more immediate financial needs. But, for those who are earning more, the perks have more appeal. For these higher earners, their reward for continued employment could be additional vacation time, flex time, increases in certain employee benefits, stock options, and so on. Perks that affect work-life balance and lifestyle seem to be more appealing to these higher wage earners.

Brian Howard is the author of The Motivated Series of Job Search Books.

Jobs Market Continues to Improve – Here’s Some Numbers

Jobs: U.S. employers added 148,000 jobs in December. That is over 85 straight months of employment growth in the U.S. The unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent. As a point of reference, the unemployment rate was 10% in 2009 which shows how our jobs market has improved over the course of time.

During 2017, the economy added over 1.5 million new jobs. However, there are some indications now that the robust jobs market could be slowing. This could be a sign of an economy at “full employment” or the inability of employers to find and hire skilled employees.

Wages: The average American earns over $26.50 an hour. That is an increase of over 50 cents an hour over the course of 2017. This news about wage growth has been anticipated as the jobs market begins to struggle to fill open positions. With a reduced supply of skilled workers (which will become a more prevalent issue in the future), employers will need to raise wages to attract and keep employees.

Underemployment: The U-6 figure from the Bureau of Labor Statistics is a statistic which includes those who have stopped looking for work and people who want full-time jobs but are stuck in part-time positions. In December that figure was 8.1% and has been trending downward over the course of the year.

Labor Participation Rate: The number of Americans in the labor force, plus those actively looking for work, has remained reasonably constant at 62.7%. Labor participation continues to struggle and still hovers close to a forty year low. This will not change partly because baby boomers continue to retire and younger Americans are choosing not to participate in the workforce.

Brian Howard is an actively practicing executive recruiter and the author of the Motivated Series of Job Search Books.

U.S Economy Adds 228,000 Jobs in November

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. economy added 228,000 jobs in November which exceeded estimates by more than 28,000 jobs. The unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent (a 17 year low). Employment continued to trend up in professional and business services, manufacturing, and health care. Manufacturing unemployment is at 2.6% (near record low).

The U.S. economy has now added jobs for the last 86 months.

Brian Howard Interviewed on Business Innovators Radio Network

Brian Howard was recently interviewed by Virginia Franco on Business Innovators Radio Network. The interview was an engaging discussion covering a wide variety of job search topics.

You can listen to the interview on Business Innovators Radio Network or on Resume Storyteller with Virginia Franco.

Brian Howard is the author of The Motivated Series of job search books which include: The Motivated Job Search, The Motivated Networker, Over 50 and Motivated, The Motivated Job Search Workbook, and Motivated Resumes and LinkedIn Profiles – all of which can be purchased on Amazon.

Unemployment Rate Falls as the Economy Adds More Jobs

The rate of unemployment has fallen to 4.1% and that is the lowest rate in nearly twenty years! The economy added 261,000 jobs in October and has added around 1.5 million jobs since the beginning of the year.

The interesting thing to watch will be wage growth. Will the increase in the employment numbers mean that wages will go up as companies compete for qualified employees? Thus far the numbers do not show that, but there has been upward wage pressure starting to appear in some industries. The open question is whether this will start to happen across more industries. Time will tell.